This is a technique I learned from Andrew Kramer’s website, a simple but powerful concept, and something I could understand and do myself.
I had to extract keyframe information for each of the 91 audio tracks and zoom into each waveform to see where exactly the most change in intensity takes place. Then I rescaled those values to make the squares dim and not just turn on and off.
The rows in the After Effects project represent 7 octaves, starting from 31 Hz (C1) On each row  there are 13 squares (and tones - pitches) because I wanted to fit 7 rows in the picture.
The actual reason for using this horizontal distribution (13 instead of 12) is because it best suited the spacing between the squares, but it works really well as it makes each octave span between C and the C an octave above. 
The audio files I used in this project are recorded with the PD (Pure Data) sampler. However, the sound design of the individual sounds used with the sampler was made with the native ProTools plugins.

This is a technique I learned from Andrew Kramer’s website, a simple but powerful concept, and something I could understand and do myself.

I had to extract keyframe information for each of the 91 audio tracks and zoom into each waveform to see where exactly the most change in intensity takes place. Then I rescaled those values to make the squares dim and not just turn on and off.

The rows in the After Effects project represent 7 octaves, starting from 31 Hz (C1) On each row  there are 13 squares (and tones - pitches) because I wanted to fit 7 rows in the picture.

The actual reason for using this horizontal distribution (13 instead of 12) is because it best suited the spacing between the squares, but it works really well as it makes each octave span between C and the C an octave above. 

The audio files I used in this project are recorded with the PD (Pure Data) sampler. However, the sound design of the individual sounds used with the sampler was made with the native ProTools plugins.

This is a technique I learned from Andrew Kramer’s website, a simple but powerful concept, and something I could understand and do myself.
I had to extract keyframe information for each of the 91 audio tracks and zoom into each waveform to see where exactly the most change in intensity takes place. Then I rescaled those values to make the squares dim and not just turn on and off.
The rows in the After Effects project represent 7 octaves, starting from 31 Hz (C1) On each row  there are 13 squares (and tones - pitches) because I wanted to fit 7 rows in the picture.
The actual reason for using this horizontal distribution (13 instead of 12) is because it best suited the spacing between the squares, but it works really well as it makes each octave span between C and the C an octave above. 
The audio files I used in this project are recorded with the PD (Pure Data) sampler. However, the sound design of the individual sounds used with the sampler was made with the native ProTools plugins.

This is a technique I learned from Andrew Kramer’s website, a simple but powerful concept, and something I could understand and do myself.

I had to extract keyframe information for each of the 91 audio tracks and zoom into each waveform to see where exactly the most change in intensity takes place. Then I rescaled those values to make the squares dim and not just turn on and off.

The rows in the After Effects project represent 7 octaves, starting from 31 Hz (C1) On each row  there are 13 squares (and tones - pitches) because I wanted to fit 7 rows in the picture.

The actual reason for using this horizontal distribution (13 instead of 12) is because it best suited the spacing between the squares, but it works really well as it makes each octave span between C and the C an octave above. 

The audio files I used in this project are recorded with the PD (Pure Data) sampler. However, the sound design of the individual sounds used with the sampler was made with the native ProTools plugins.

Posted 2 years ago & Filed under audio keyframes, After Effects, View high resolution

About:

audio visual work

- currently studying Creative Music Technology @ Bath Spa University

- contact: andrei.branea09@bathspa.ac.uk

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